About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
reports on the impact that each navy made during the war, from union naval support of numerous battles, including vicksburg and new orleans to the confederates use of naval mines and the militaristic deployment of a submarine. it's a little under an hour. >> good evening, everyone. last time we met here on this very stage to talk about the civil war, jim, you are looking to finishing touches on your new book. you are preparing your publication as well. now i have to do this the way they do it on the talk shows. now, james mcpherson "war on the waters" and craig, the civil war at sea, very handsomely done, are both out. that's good because we get to resume our -- we barely scratched the surface. let's get right to it because we spoke for an hour last time, we got to about january 1862. so i will assume you all know about 1861, and get to something that jim pointed out. that was rather interesting. is that 150 years ago this month, besides all the other things that were going on, the realization that lincoln had promulgated -- [inaudible] the union had commenced -- the tennessee cumberla
the united states, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea. so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. the destroyer escort is sort of a novel type of vessel. it's smaller than a destroyer, um, around 300 feet. and it had a shorter turning radius so that it could, it could essentially turn on a dime compared to a destroyer. so what they did is they escorted the convoys across the atlantic, and the convoys consisted of troop ships and supply ships for the war effort. but if they, if they made contact with a u-boat, they could break off, and then they could pursue that u-boat. when you look at the record, though, i mean, 70 u-boats, they probably were, without question, the most successful antisubmarine vessel in the fleet. this ship is the uss slater. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyer esc
between the united states and europe. the president ordered them built in 1940 but the navy decided that was probably not a good idea, so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. i think, if you look at the record you will see that probably was a good idea. the destroyer escort is sort of a novel type of vessel. is smaller than a destroyer, around 300 feet and it had a shorter turning radius so that it could essentially turn on a dime compared to a destroyer. so what they did is they escorted the convoys across the atlantic and the convoys consisted of troop ships and supplied ships for the war effort but if they made contact with the u-boat they could break off in the naked turso's -- ers to that u-boat. when you look at the record, 70 u-boats, they probably were without question the most successful anti-submarine festival on the fleet. this ship is the uss later. it was built in the tampa shipyard for 563 to destroyer escorts build and 17 shipyards all across the country. this was 1944. as they had
set of invisible eyes. he went to the recruiting station. he watch the navy and the navy had one line and go to the line, and the psychological exams. he watch the coast guard who had two lines and the first was for your physical exam, and the psychological exam. for your eye exam and figured that would give just enough time to slip the contact lens in his eye which he did and the recruiter said read the bottom line. he said how far down? as far as you can read. what are you reading? the bottom line. you are reading patent pending. you have the eyes of an eagle. that was just how so many people, so many sailors that i interviewed, they did it because of patriotism, because it is the right thing to do and, we sent them to see in a new and untested vessel that the navy fought additionally was a colossal waste of money. no warship had ever been manned by an african-american crew and the first warship to be managed by an african-american crew was the uss mason which was a destroyer escort. franklin roosevelt wanted to do something to end racial discrimination in the military and industry
, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea, so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if, if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. .. it was built in the tampa shipyard. there were 563 destroyed air escorts built. seventeen shipyards all across the country. it actually came late in the game, like a lot of them. this is 1944. it did a few escort's back and forth across the atlantic. one interesting thing that the slater did do, the only nazi submarine, the only you-book captured by the americans and will work to was captured by destroyer escort. they get a treasure trove of material, conference of documents, actually a half a ton from this you -- u-boat 505. one of the torpedoes was loaded on to this letter and brought back to america for study along with the all important in the machine, and that was the codebreaking machine. and it actually was
that are off now the brooklyn navy yard two prison ships had something at 11,000 people that died on them. again they are not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial singularly. those prison ships, washington protests them all through the war. the people on the ships, they were not being fed and they were dying on the ships. if you were an officer or you had some money, but if you are neither of those things, then you died on them. the thing is, after the war, even 27% died on them. more people died on prison ships than died in all the battles but after the war nobody does anything about these prison ships filled with bones. they are still riding the ferry to manhattan and saying hey i can see these ruins out here and all of these bones are on there. wittman is writing editorials in the 18 30s and 40s saying that we have to do something about this. we have made a memorial for general washington all the beautiful statues on wall street but nobody has done anything for the people of the general washington to donate big business funds and of course on the ships there is n
or evangelical white males. some sexuality is characterized by wearing navy blue or gray suits with red ties, frequent church attendance, and public denunciation of other homosexuals. many occupy positions of authority and it can beat -- in can be found working as republican school board members, republican activists, a christian men's group leaders and republican legislators. prominent homosexuals include roy aspirin and larry craig. ted haggard. >> prominent. >> we will do a couple more. >> donald trump. >> well, he might be in the book. >> we to have the entry for asshole. [laughter] >> i think that's why we put an end. >> any individual at a bar, party, or other social function having more fun than you. also include those who are dating attractive women to make more money than you, or manage to handle everything life throws at them with composure. often have great, loving families to use proper grammar, know about want to exercise regularly to make wise financial decisions , donate to charities and read books. >> people have their lives together. >> is newt gingrich in your? >> that guy
that were part of the navy, you had to figure out am i citizens or subject of. who is going let me in to their territory? no one -- see, people neglect the southern hemisphere because it's so much easier. >> i'm sorry? >> there's no water. easy to cycle across australia. >> well, people have done it since. the first man to walk across -- walk around the world goes over australia. with a mule. an at that point, this is 20th century. he could get food and water more easily. yes, the surface travelers, i must say, are some of the touchest, if not the most mean-spirited people in the world. you have to be that way. it's hard to do both physically and i think socially to put yourself at risk constantly like that. it's a bloody-minded thing to do. i'm not -- i don't sense among people you're going go off and do it. [laughter] any time soon. or maybe so. >> [inaudible] the dangers and the -- i guess what -- what did both -- what are some do you have some stories about the local people how they reacted to these adventures and how they may have supported them the government? are there other
. >> at think that to prison ships better off what is now the brooklyn navy yard, to prison ships have something like 11,000, it's an estimate. people bynum. and again, that points. they're not the people who you would necessarily build a giant memorial for singularly. but, yes, those prison ships, washington protested the malta the war. people on the ships were not being fed, barely being fed to my dying and the ships. and if you got off, if you were an officer or if you had some money, but if you were neither of those things you died on them. and after the war even, you know, 47% unease. >> well, more people died in prison ships than all the battles. but after the work noted does anything about these prison ships. and people write in the ferry to manhattan. hey, i can see these folks out there, hoping runs. all of these bones are on a. and woodman is writing in the 1830's, 40's. we have to do something about this. we have made a memorial for general washington and all the business. by a beautiful statue down on wall street, but no one has done anything for the people who are not general washin
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9